Cat Behavior: Weird or Normal? (Part Two)

We know that cats present their butts and chirp at birds but why do they do this, and why is it so weird?

 

In part one, we began our journey of bizarre cat behavior by looking at various oddball behaviors such as cats throwing shade and eating grass. In today’s post, we’ll explore more of these behaviors and try to understand what they mean!

 

At Vet Set, we know cats! We love to help you keep them happy and healthy so they can continue being their weird selves! Partner with us and find amazing care at our vet hospital! In the meantime, let’s learn more about our cat’s behavior.

Are All Cats This Strange?

 

Enjoy more odd cat behaviors below and dive into them with us and what they mean!

 

Getting Vocal With Birds

 

Cats love to get vocal with the birds that are flying around outside, only to get frustrated that can’t be out there harassing them. When you notice this chatter or clacking sound — different from many other sounds cats make — cat experts break this down to cats becoming frustrated that they aren’t able to act upon their prey drive and go after the bird, so elicit movement of the jaw happens. This act mimics them catching and killing prey, so though the noise is a little bizarre as it is hilarious, it serves a purpose!

 

Receiving Interesting Presents

 

Cats love to bring presents, dead presents that is! Have you ever wondered why they drop dead birds, snakes, and mice off at the door for you?

 

This is also an act of endearment for cats — not only are they displaying their cunning and successful talents, they’re essentially sharing part of the hunt with you! You are a part of the kitty squad!

 

While this may remain a bit unappetizing for humans, don’t discourage this behavior. You can help keep their prey alive and off your doorstep by attaching a bell to their collar.

 

Cat Kneading

 

Cats love to make a kneading motion, and as a human, you should just relax and enjoy the affection! Cats knead as a way to mark their territory and better quell any anxieties.

 

This behavior is innate and it begins after birth as a way for kittens to stimulate the mammary glands of their mothers to get milk.

 

“If I Fits, I Sits!”

Cats love to find odd places to curl up into — from tiny boxes to a bathroom sink — if a cat can fit, they will absolutely sit! Cats love smaller places because it makes them feel safe and protected, and it’s also a survival mechanism.

 

In the wild, cats aren’t safe in a wide open area where larger predators roam, which is why they would seek refuge in dens and smaller nooks and crannies, to stay away from their predators. So, the next time you find them in a place that looks super uncomfortable, just leave them be — they don’t want to be hunted or perhaps bothered!  

 

Rolling Around

 

If your cat is constantly rolling around, it is signaling that it feels safe in its surroundings and around you. It may also roll wildly while under the influence of catnip or when they’re trying to mark their scent and claim your space as their own!

 

Yelping in The Night

 

Sleep is precious to humans, so when your furry feline wakes you up with their insistent crying, it can drive you mad. This happens as a result of their urge to be out and about hunting prey. These cries are out of frustration that they can’t catch anything or out of excitement that they did!

 

Curb this energy by giving them more to do at night or even giving them the option to go hunt!

 

Cats are interesting creatures, to put it lightly, and they display a whole host of behaviors we have a hard time discerning as humans! From the affectionate displays of their butts to chattering with the birds, you can bet that all of this is cat language and it serves some clue to what’s behind it, even when it is strange!

 

To get the best care for your cat, connect with our vet clinic in the Carroll Gardens area today!

 

Pet Parent Information

Last Name

Zip Code

Pet Information

Species
Gender

Additional pets?

To make an appointment, please call us at (917) 741-4737 or
email us at info@vetset.net.

Powered by Top Rated Local®