The Six Signs Your Dog is Trying to Tell You Something (Part One)

Pet parents take on caring for their animals just as much as people care for their human children, but unlike kids, animals can’t verbally communicate to tell alert someone if something is wrong. Until a pet translator is invented, pet parent’s will have to rely on body language their pet provides to understand what’s going on.

 

Though every vet may not be like Dr. Doolittle, most have the skills and techniques to help us determine what’s going on in our pet’s health. At VetSet, our animal care clinic in Carroll Gardens provides a myriad of diagnostics, vaccinations, acupuncture, and dental services for your pet to ensure optimal health and wellness. Join us in today’s post about the signs that your dog may give when trying to tell you something.

Listen and Look For Signs From Your Pet

 

Body language is the form of communication that we’re able to somewhat use to understand our pets and no one knows your dog better than you, so pay attention to the little things they may be telling you.

 

Below are some signs you may recognize that your pet is trying to tell you something.

 

Changes in Behavior

If your pet is normally spunky in the morning and loves walks or waking up to fetch the newspaper with you and then suddenly is lethargic and unwilling to get up, this behavioral change could indicate something is wrong. Other indicators may be irritability or aggressiveness towards other pets and family members.

 

Digestive Issues

 

If your pet begins to have symptoms of diarrhea, loss of appetite, constipation, or vomiting, these are clear signs that something is up. Also, keep an eye on what their poop is saying such as bloody stool or abnormal colors — this could indicate issues in their abdomen. Dog bloat which is potentially life-threatening and can come with signs such as excessive drooling, dry heaves, restlessness, and a bloated belly.

 

Respiratory Concerns

 

If your dog is coughing, sneezing, or has abnormal discharge from their nose, this could indicate a respiratory issue or infection. If their breathing is labored or they’re wheezing, this sign should be taken very seriously. Also pay close attention if you have dogs with short snouts like pugs or bulldogs, as they’re more susceptible.

 

Pain

 

All dogs experience pain and discomfort at some point, but chronic pain and symptoms associated with it can indicate more serious problems. Signs to look for are stiffness when walking, a reluctance to jump or even walk, swelling in the bones and joints, becoming aggressive when a specific area is touched.

 

Changes in Elimination Habits

 

Trained dogs should have no problem going outside to go to the bathroom, but it’s when they begin urinating and defecating indoors where it could be a sign that there is an illness. When they’re constantly having to go outside this could be related to their kidneys, and if they have trouble passing stool this is could also be cause for concern.

 

Coat and Skin Appearance

 

If your dog’s coat is normally full and vibrant and it has recently retreated to being dull and patchy, this is one of the first signs something could be going on. And, if your dog also has red, irritated skin, or lumps check in with the vet so they can examine your dog and monitor them for any changes.

 

There are many signs that express something may be wrong whether they’re telling you through their behavior or in bodily changes. We have yet to explore the signs beyond digestive issues and pain, so stay tuned for part two!

 

If you think your dog is trying to tell you something or you see physical changes in them, schedule an examination with us today!

 

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To make an appointment, please call us at (917) 741-4737 or
email us at info@vetset.net.

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